cross-mountains-sunsetAfter Pentecost (Acts 3 and later), Christ-followers were first involved in something called “the Way” (Acts 24:22). After the gospel progressed to the non-Jewish world with the planting of the church in Antioch, the world called Christ-followers “Christians” because they were made up of both Jews and Gentiles who exhibited a radical devotion to be like Christ (Acts 11:26). Since Christianity was legalized by Emperor Constantine in the Edict of Milan (A.D. 313), Christianity went from being “the Way” to an institution that included nominal members who knew nothing regarding the radical faith of their early forbears. Since that time Christianity has become a popular, commercialized entity with only a remnant of followers with a biblically-based, radical commitment. (By “radical” I do not mean extreme or fanatical with odd anti-social and/or violent behavior; I mean the dictionary definition: “radical: affecting the fundamental nature of something; far-reaching or thorough.”) Unfortunately, what many today deem as radical was considered normal Christianity in the early church, and what is considered normal in the present church would be considered compromising to the early church. More