TRADE “With Ebola, everyone is afraid. No one wants to go out,” 50-year-old Li tells AFP at the 70-cover eatery in Freetown’s Murray Town district. Li has been in the capital for two decades but, like many entrepreneurs in the once-thriving and influential Chinese community, he is thinking of packing it in and heading back home. “Before Ebola, all the Chinese and some foreigners came here to eat. Now nobody comes. We have no customers. We may have to close,” he says. Ebola, a virulent tropical hemorrhagic fever, has claimed almost 1,500 lives since the start of the year in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria. Eastern Sierra Leone has been particularly hard-hit, but a death in Freetown has spread fear that the capital could be in line for a wave of cases. The quarantining of eight Chinese medical workers was particularly shocking to their compatriots, say members of the community in Freetown. An exodus by Chinese business would be calamitous for the commercial centre of Sierra Leone, one of the world’s poorest countries still struggling to recover from a ruinous 11-year civil war which ended in 2002. The Chinese embassy estimates the community in Freetown to number only “several hundred,” a spokesman told AFP, but its influence extends far beyond its size. Dozens of Chinese restaurants, hardware stores, machine parts manufacturers and construction firms can be seen across the sprawling city of 1.2 million people. Chinese contractors have built bridges and roads, Freetown’s national stadium, government and parliament offices and a 100-bed hospital close to the capital. Beijing has invested in agriculture, health care and education in Sierra Leone since 1971, when diplomatic ties were first fostered during Chairman Mao’s Cultural Revolution in China. EP