Many people point their fingers at climate change, underwater weapons testing, ocean quakes and biodiversity, as reasons behind the collapse of the marine ecosystem. While there’s something to be said for these issues as contributing factors in the decline of marine life, the fact remains that the ongoing after-effects of Fukushima’s radiation plays a significant role too. Consider this: in 2006 – years before the nuclear disaster in Japan – a paper was published in the journal Science, which warned of the fate of marine life. Lead author Boris Worm, assistant professor of marine conservation biology at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada, noted that “… all fish and seafood species are projected to collapse within my lifetime — by 2048.”

An abstract of that paper, entitled, Impact of Biodiversity Loss on Ocean Ecosystem Services, states that, “We conclude that marine biodiversity loss is increasingly impairing the ocean’s capacity to provide food, maintain water quality, and recover from perturbations.” Now, let’s take this shocking 2048 end-of-fish-and-seafood-species statement and add to it something that hadn’t yet occurred when the paper was published in 2006: Fukushima. With upwards of about 800 tonnes of Cesium-134 said to have leaked into the Pacific ocean on a daily basis ever since the 2011 disaster, it’s only logical to conclude that yet another factor – radiation – can be tossed into this biodiversity/sea quakes/climate change mix when attempting to explain the tragic loss of marine life species. FULL REPORT