150117danielwebsterstatueOne of the five greatest senators in U.S. history, the State of New Hampshire placed his statue in the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall. His career spanned almost four decades, serving as secretary of State for Presidents William Harrison, John Tyler and Millard Fillmore. His name was Daniel Webster, born Jan. 18, 1782.  From a New Hampshire farm, he attended Dartmouth College and became the highest paid attorney of his day. He fought the slave trade and negotiated the Webster-Ashburton Treaty, which set the nation’s Northeast boundary. When South Carolina threatened nullification, he stated: “Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable!” When asked what the most profound thought was that ever passed through his mind, Daniel Webster responded: “My accountability to God.” At the age of 20, Daniel Webster served as the headmaster of Fryeburg Academy in Fryeburg, Maine, where he delivered a Fourth of July Oration in 1802: “If an angel should be winged from Heaven, on an errand of mercy to our country, the first accents that would glow on his lips would be, ‘Beware! Be cautious! You have everything to lose; nothing to gain.’ We live under the only government that ever existed which was framed by the unrestrained and deliberate consultations of the people. Miracles do not cluster. That which has happened but once in six thousand years cannot be expected to happen often. Such a government, once gone, might leave a void, to be filled, for ages, with revolution and tumult, riot and despotism.” More