A method of wirelessly transferring power to devices embedded deep in the body could lead to a new era of 'electronic medicine'. The technology developed in California could eliminate the bulky batteries and clumsy recharging systems that hinder wider use of medical implants, such as pacemakers (pictured)
A method of wirelessly transferring power to devices embedded deep in the body could lead to a new era of ‘electronic medicine’, say researchers. The technology developed in California could eliminate the bulky batteries and clumsy recharging systems that hinder wider use of medical implants. After successfully powering a tiny heart pacemaker in a rabbit, the system is now being prepared for human trials.  The hope is that it will assist the development of ultra-small devices that can be used instead of drugs to treat disease or control pain.  Known as ‘electroceuticals’, these device may be more effective than drugs for some disorders, such as those affecting specific regions of the brain. More