California Drought Water Flows Uphill
Water has flowed from Northern California’s snow-capped peaks to the south’s parched cities ever since the California Aqueduct was built in the 1960s. Now, amid one of the worst droughts in history, state officials are considering an audacious plan to send some of the water back uphill. State water engineers say using pumps to reverse the flow of the aqueduct would be a first in a drought. It would also be a complex engineering challenge that could cost millions of dollars. Still, water agencies in the desperately dry farmlands around Bakersfield say the investment is worth it to keep grapevines, pistachios and pomegranate trees alive. Agencies as far north as the San Francisco Bay Area are talking about a similar project. “There is no place on planet Earth where an aqueduct is designed to go backwards,” said Geoff Shaw, an engineer with the state Department of Water Resources who is reviewing the proposal. “But they have a need for water in a place where they can’t fulfill it, and this is their plan to fix it.” More