People of faith not only have a right to freely express their beliefs, but the government can’t force them to express ideas that are contrary to their deeply held beliefs. That’s what the Kentucky Court of Appeals decided Friday in the case of a Lexington printer who declined an order that would have forced him to promote a message in conflict with his Christian beliefs. This is the second time Blaine Adamson, owner of Hands On Originals, has successfully defended his rights against the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Human Rights Commission.

In 2012, Adamson declined to print shirts with a message promoting the Lexington Pride Festival, an event that the Gay and Lesbian Services Organization hosted. Although he declined to print the shirts because of the message that would have been on them, he nevertheless offered to refer the GLSO to another printer who would have made the shirts. Unsatisfied, the GLSO filed a complaint with the commission—despite eventually receiving the shirts for free from another printer. READ MORE