Just after noon on November 22, 1963, the US lost its 35th president to a bullet in Dallas. The assassination of President John F. Kennedy spurred numerous conspiracy theories, many of which doubted whether sniper Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone and asserting that the CIA was involved. And now, a declassified 2013 report by CIA historian David Robarge details how, at the very least, the CIA knew much more than it has let on. The report states that John McCone, then the director of the CIA, withheld important information from President Lyndon B. Johnson’s “Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy” — also referred to as the “Warren Commission” — and that top agency officials were part of a “benign cover-up.”

The spy agency acknowledges that McCone and other high-ranking CIA officials kept “incendiary and diversionary issues” from the investigation, much of which may have shed light on how Oswald spent his time in the years before the assassination. “For a complete nobody, Oswald certainly did seem to hang out with well-connected people,”University of Virginia professor Larry Sabato, author of “The Kennedy Half-Century: The Presidency, Assassination, and Lasting Legacy of John F.Kennedy,” told Business Insider in 2013. CONTINUE