Preparing For The Third Temple – Priests In Training Prepare Trial Run For Temple Sacrifice The fall of the Second Temple 2,000-odd years ago may have seen the end of sacrificial offerings in Judaism. But ahead of Friday’s festival of Passover, the Jerusalem-based Temple Institute has released a video offering an “authentic reenactment” of the ancient biblical practice. The sacrificial lamb marks the miraculous exodus of the Jewish people from Egypt, as recorded in the Hebrew Bible. The ceremony was formally suspended for Jews with the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE, and is now only performed by the Samaritan community, which will hold its annual event on Mount Gerizim in the West Bank on May 2, 2015. The roots of the sacrifice are found in the Book of Exodus. Ahead of the last of the 10 plagues on Egypt, the death of the firstborns, God tells Moses to speak to the people of Israel and instruct each household to obtain a lamb on the 10th of Nisan. The lambs should be kept until the 14th, when the people of Israel should slaughter them at dusk. Later, they should take its blood and put it on their doorposts and on the lintel of the houses in which they are eating. The fire-roasted lamb’s flesh should then all be consumed that night with unleavened bread and bitter herbs. In the biblical Kingdom of Israel, the annual sacrifice was conducted by the Kohanim, or priestly class, on Jerusalem’s Temple Mount. Interestingly, although Jesus is often referred to as the “Paschal lamb,” historians say an actual Paschal lamb was likely the main course at the historical Last Supper. Based on the Christian scriptures, many scholars claim the famous meal was indeed a Passover Seder. Located in Jerusalem’s Old City, the Temple Institute is a non-profit government- and privately funded center of “research and preparation for the Holy Temple.” It recently established a bi-weekly “Cohanim Training Academy,” in which students considered members of the priestly caste (through patriarchal lineage) are taught and practically prepared for future “Holy Temple service.” The international director of the Temple Institute, Rabbi Chaim Richman, claims that the video, which was uploaded Monday and is somewhat graphic, portrays the “most accurate and authentic reenactment of this service to have taken place in nearly 2,000 years.” FULL REPORT