Health care then guns: Nazis lay plan for destroying freedomThe National Socialist Workers’ Party leader, Adolph Hitler, became chancellor of Germany on Jan. 30, 1933, and began implementing a plan of universal health care, with no regard for conscience. The New York Times reported Oct. 10, 1933: “Nazi Plan to Kill Incurables to End Pain; German Religious Groups Oppose Move.”  “The Ministry of Justice,” the Times reported, “explaining the Nazi aims regarding the German penal code, today announced its intentions to authorize physicians to end the sufferings of the incurable patient … in the interest of true humanity.”

The Times continued: “The Catholic newspaper Germania hastened to observe: ‘The Catholic faith binds the conscience of its followers not to accept this method.’ … In Lutheran circles, too, life is regarded as something that God alone can take. … Euthanasia … has become a widely discussed word in the Reich. … No life still valuable to the State will be wantonly destroyed.”

When Germany’s economy suffered, expenses had to be cut from the national health-care plan, such as keeping alive handicapped, insane, chronically ill, elderly and those with dementia. They were considered “lebensunwertes leben” – life unworthy of life. Then criminals, convicts, street bums, beggars and gypsies, considered “leeches” on society, met a similar fate.

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger had been the editor of the Birth Control Review, a magazine that published in April 1933 an article by Ernst Rudin, one of the “fathers of racial hygiene.” Ernst Rudin advised the Nazi Socialist Workers Party to prevent hereditary defective genes from being passed on to future generations by people considered by the State to be inferior mankind – “untermensch.” Labeling the Aryan race “ubermensch” (super mankind), the National Socialist Workers Party enacted horrific plans to purge the human gene pool of what they considered “inferior” races, resulting in 6 million Jews and millions of others dying in gas chambers and ovens.

U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop stated in 1977: “When the first 273,000 German aged, infirm and retarded were killed in gas chambers there was no outcry from that medical profession … and it was not far from there to Auschwitz.”

British Journalist Malcolm Muggeridge explained: “We have … for those that have eyes to see, an object lesson in what the quest for ‘quality of life’ without reference to ‘sanctity of life’ can involve. … The origins of the Holocaust lay, not in Nazi terrorism … but in … Germany’s acceptance of euthanasia and mercy-killing as humane and estimable.”

In 1933, the German Reichstag (Capitol Building) was set on fire under suspicious conditions, creating a crisis Hitler used to suspend basic rights, arrest his political opponents and have them shot without a trial. Hitler forced old military leaders to retire. He swayed the public with mesmerizing speeches. An SA Oberführer warned of an ordinance by the provisional Bavarian Minister of the Interior: “The deadline set … for the surrender of weapons will expire on March 31, 1933. I therefore request the immediate surrender of all arms. … Whoever does not belong to one of these named units (SA, SS and Stahlhelm) and … keeps his weapon without authorization or even hides it, must be viewed as an enemy of the national government and will be held responsible without hesitation and with the utmost severity.” More