Kelvin-Cochran-Flag-FacebookApparently, The New York Times is in favor of faith in the public square—if the purpose is to mock it. Editors at theTimes poured gasoline on the fire of Atlanta’s latest controversy with an editorial that should shock even their most liberal readers. Just when you thought the media couldn’t sink any lower, the Times takes on the same First Amendment that gives it the freedom to print these vicious attacks on Christians. In a stunning column on Jan. 13, the newspaper argues that men and women of faith have no place in public management of any kind. The piece, which shows a remarkable disinterest in the facts, claims that Atlanta Fire Chief Kelvin Cochran didn’t have permission to publish his book on biblical morality. Not only did Cochran have permission from the city’s ethics office to publish his book, but he only distributed it in his personal capacity at church—where a handful of his coworkers attend. But the shoddy journalism didn’t end there. Editors insisted that Cochran’s book was full of “virulent anti-gay views”—when in fact, the 162 page book only mentioned homosexuality twice. And both times, the conversation merely echoed the Bible’s teachings on the subject. For that—privately espousing a faith that a majority of Americans share—Kelvin was fired. More