dewwWith so many questions still remaining as to how folks like Dr. Rick Sacra, who never even treated Ebola patients, somehow managed to contract the supposedly non-airborne disease, the University of Minnesota’s Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) has issued new guidelines recommending that all front-line health workers be outfitted with full respirators, a recommendation which suggests that Ebola could very well have gone airborne. In a recent commentary, Drs. Lisa M. Brosseau, Sc.D., and Rachael Jones, Ph.D., make the case for respirators, not just face masks, as necessary equipment in the fight against Ebola. Recommending the precautionary approach in such a serious matter, the duo says that, just because it hasn’t been confirmed that Ebola can transfer through the air doesn’t mean that it shouldn’t be treated as such, especially when people’s lives are on the line. The fact of the matter is that Ebola has never been proven not to transmit through the air, which is reason enough to assume that it does for the safety of workers on the ground. The two doctors explain that, scientifically speaking, Ebola currently has “unclear modes of transmission,” meaning nobody truly knows all the ways that infections can emerge. “We believe there is scientific and epidemiologic evidence that Ebola virus has the potential to be transmitted via infectious aerosol particles both near and at a distance from infected patients, which means that healthcare workers should be wearing respirators, not facemasks,” they wrote, citing an earlier paper Dr. Brosseau published in the American Journal of Infection Control. More