lavaIceland’s Bardarbunga volcano continues to rumble, threatening to blow its top and throw tons of ash into the atmosphere like the Eyjafjallajökull volcano did in 2010. This time, however, scientists will be tracking the volcano minute by minute with an array of instruments that they hope will allow them to predict any impending eruption and give early warning of the dangers. Bardarbunga has been at “code red” twice since it started erupting on August 29th last blasting molten rock 100 meters into the air. The question is will it be an explosive release that could cloud the skies over Europe with ash, said Prof Simon Redfern, professor in Earth sciences at the University of Cambridge. “There is no sign of that happening yet.” He and four other volcanology experts joined today to talk about the risks posed by Bardarbunga at the British Science Association’s annual festival of science. These included Dr. David McGarvie of the Open University who was in touch by mobile phone from a tent pitched near where the eruption is taking place. The volcano currently bristles with monitoring equipment including 70 seismometers along with strain gauges to measure pressures underground. Some of these have been moved hastily to prevent them being covered by flowing lava. More