04LSD-videoSixteenByNine1050For the first time in more than four decades, the drug lysergic acid diethylamide — better known as LSD — has been the experimental adjunct to psychotherapy in a controlled clinical trial approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. And a newly published study on that trial reports that the medication’s anti-anxiety effects on patients facing life-threatening illnesses were sizable, sustained — and free of worrisome side effects. In short, everything was groovy. In a pilot study conducted in Switzerland, 12 patients suffering deep anxiety due to serious illnesses participated in several drug-free psychotherapy sessions, and then joined a pair of therapists for two full-day psychotherapy sessions, separated by two to three weeks, under the influence of LSD. After tapering off any anti-anxiety or antidepressant medications and avoiding alcohol for at least a day, subjects in the trial were given either a 200-microgram dose of LSD or an “active placebo” of 20 micrograms of the drug. MORE